Jan 14, 2020 5:08 PM

The Latest: Kansas man injured in knife attack has died

Posted Jan 14, 2020 5:08 PM
Prager photo Sedgwick County
Prager photo Sedgwick County

SEDGWICK COUNTY — The man critically injured in an aggravated knife attack in Wichita has died, according to police captain Brent Allred.

Just after 5p.m. January 11, police responded to an assault call at a home in the 200 block of North Spruce in Wichita, according to officer Charley Davidson.

Upon arrival, police found a 19-year-old man identified as Vincent Venturella with a severe laceration to his neck. Investigators learned that 24-year-old Morgan Prager  of Pittsburg, Kansas arrived at the residence. He and the Venturella were involved in a dispute over an ex-girlfriend and a sister, according to Davidson.

Prager cut Venturella and fled from the home. Wichita police coordinated efforts with police in Pittsburg to arrest Prager and bring him back to Wichita, according to Davidson.

Venturella died Monday night.  Prager is being held on a $250,000 bond on a requested charge of first-degree murder, according to online jail records.

The case will be presented to the Sedgwick County District Attorney.

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SEDGWICK COUNTY — Law enforcement authorities are investigating a Kansas man for alleged attempted murder.

Just after 5p.m. January 11, police responded to an assault call at a home in the 200 block of North Spruce in Wichita, according to officer Charley Davidson.

Upon arrival, police found a 19-year-old man with a severe laceration to his neck. Investigators learned that 24-year-old Morgan Prager  of Pittsburg, Kansas arrived at the residence. He and the victim were involved in a dispute over an ex-girlfriend and a sister, according to Davidson.

Prager cut the victim and fled from the home. Wichita police coordinated efforts with police in Pittsburg to arrest Prager and bring him back to Wichita, according to Davidson.

The victim remains hospitalized late Monday morning. The case will be presented to the Sedgwick County District Attorney.

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Jan 14, 2020 5:08 PM
Kansas Farm Bureau Insight: Stronger together

By GLENN BRUNKOW, Pottawatomie County farmer and rancher

We have flipped the calendar to a new year, and that also means the “silly season” of politics is starting in earnest. This year promises to be an even sillier year than most because of state and national elections.

More than just about any year I can remember, there is more at stake for our nation, state and, most importantly, for rural Kansas.

Increasingly we are seeing our population drop in most of rural Kansas, which means our political influence also is shrinking. We are seeing a shift of political power swing to more populated portions of the state. This could spell trouble for agriculture as many of those in more urban areas are more removed from agriculture and often don’t fully understand our point of view or how issues affect us.

That is why it is so important for us to tell our side of the story, for us to let our views and stances on critical issues be known. If we don’t advocate for ourselves no one else will, and our interests will be forgotten.I know many of you are like me. I feel like I am so bogged down in my day-to-day activities and work that I don’t have time to get involved. It is hard to know how to make your opinion heard and even harder to know how to make your vote count. It seems awfully lonely out here in rural Kansas and in agriculture.

I agree — it is hard to make your voice heard as a lone citizen. It is possible, and it is something we should not ignore. But often a lone voice is not very effective. That is why being a member of Kansas Farm Bureau is so critical for all of us in agriculture. It is a way for us to combine our voices and make them louder.

When we come together as a group, we magnify our power and influence. However, this does not lessen the importance of each one of us or our individual influence over our own elected officials. That is why it is also important to not only join Kansas Farm Bureau but to be an active member. In the coming weeks and months we will have an opportunity to voice our opinion and to help educate and influence our elected officials. Through the elections we will also have the chance to decide who many of those officials are.

I ask that you take the time to find out how you can be an active part in the efforts of our Kansas Farm Bureau. Sign up for alerts and contact your elected officials. Kansas Farm Bureau is the most influential farm organization in our state, and that is because we are a grassroots organization of farmers and ranchers who band together for a stronger, louder voice.

"Insight" is a weekly column published by Kansas Farm Bureau, the state's largest farm organization whose mission is to strengthen agriculture and the lives of Kansans through advocacy, education and service.